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Lead Teaching Fellowship

Lead Teaching Fellowship

Obesity is killing more Americans than previously thought

Obesity is killing more Americans than previously thought

Obesity is far more deadly than previously thought. In the past few decades, obesity has been responsible for 18 percent of deaths among black and white Americans between the ages of 40 and 85, according to scientists. This result calls into question the prevailing wisdom among scientists, which puts this proportion at around 5%. Obesity has dramatically worse health consequences than some of the recent ones

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Richard Ford returns with a new collection of stories

Richard Ford returns with a new collection of stories

  • News Sorry for Your Trouble, his fourteenth fictional work, is a short story book about Irish Americans - or Americans in Ireland.
Master of Science degree

Master of Science degree

  • Others The Master of Science focuses on specialist knowledge with a broad public health scope for building a successful career. Find out how to get started today.
Girls are more likely to have sex, take sexual risks, and marry young if they menstruate early

Girls are more likely to have sex, take sexual risks, and marry young if they menstruate early

  • Others The timing of a girl's first menstrual period can affect her first sexual encounter, first pregnancy, and her susceptibility to some sexually transmitted infections, according to a meta-analysis by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. These patterns of sexual and reproductive health of girls in low- and middle-income countries that
The Curse of Greatness Antitrust Law in the New Gilded Age

The Curse of Greatness Antitrust Law in the New Gilded Age

  • Others A warning of the dangers of excessive corporate and industrial concentration for our economic and political future.
Kimberle W. Crenshaw

Kimberle W. Crenshaw

  • Others Kimberlé W. Crenshaw is a seminal scholar and author on civil rights, critical racial theory, feminist black and racial legal theory, racism and law. In addition to her position at Columbia Law School, she is Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles. Crenshaw's work was fundamental to critical racial theory and intersectionality, a term she coined to describe the double bond of concurrent racial and gender prejudice. Her studies, writing, and activism have identified key issues in perpetuating inequality, including the school-to-prison pipeline for African American children and the criminalization of teenage black girls' behavior. Through the Columbia Law School's African American Policy Forum (AAPF), which she co-founded, Crenshaw co-authored (with Andrea Ritchie) Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women, which documented and brought attention to the murder of black women and girls from the police. Crenshaw and AAPF then launched the #SayHerName campaign to raise awareness of police violence against black women and girls. Crenshaw is a sought-after speaker and leads workshops and trainings. She is also the co-author of Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced, and Underprotected. Her texts have appeared in the Harvard Law Review, the National Black Law Journal, the Stanford Law Review, and the Southern California Law Review. She is the founding coordinator of the Critical Race Theory workshop and co-editor of Critical Race Theory: Key Documents That Shaped the Movement. In 1981, she assisted Anita Hill's legal team while giving evidence at the Clarence Thomas Supreme Court hearing. Crenshaw is a regular contributor to The New Republic, The Nation and Ms., and provides commentary for media outlets such as MSNBC and NPR, and hosts the Intersectionality Matters podcast! In addition to frequent lectures, training courses, and town halls, Crenshaw has led workshops for human rights defenders in Brazil and India and for constitutional judges in South Africa. She is a member of the Law and Justice Committee of the National Academies of Science. Crenshaw's pioneering work on intersectionality was influential in drafting the equality clause in the South African constitution. She prepared the background paper on Racial and Gender Discrimination for the United Nations World Conference on Racism in 2001, was rapporteur for the Conference's Expert Group on Gender and Racial Discrimination, and coordinated efforts by NGOs to promote gender inclusion in the WCAR Declaration Conference.
Becca Thomas '13 and Jessica Caldwell '12 adapt Gonzo Girl

Becca Thomas '13 and Jessica Caldwell '12 adapt Gonzo Girl

  • Arts The alumnae of the film program Jessica Caldwell ‘12 and Becca Thomas ‘13 will adapt and direct Gonzo Girl from the publishing house Simon & Schuster. Cherl Della Pietra's novel is inspired by the author's crazy experiences working with the late journalist and
Design your future series of events

Design your future series of events

  • Sps This March, Columbia University School of Professional Studies is hosting a series of multidisciplinary discussions that will bring together faculty, practitioners and ...
Lina Khan

Lina Khan

  • Others Lina Khan teaches and writes on antitrust law, infrastructure law, the antimonopoly tradition as well as law and political economy. Several of her writings have focused on how dominant digital platforms are re-exposing the shortcomings of the current antitrust approach. Khan's work has been published by the Columbia Law Review, Harvard Law Review, University of Chicago Law Review, and the Yale Law Journal. The New York Times has described Khan's scholarship as a reformulation of decade-long monopoly law, and Politico has described her as the leader of a new school of antitrust law. Her article Amazon's Antitrust Paradox won the Antitrust Writing Award 2018 for Best Academic Unilateral Conduct Article, her article The Separation of Platforms and Commerce won the Jerry S. Cohen Memorial Fund's Best Antitrust Article on Remedies in 2019 and her co-author of The Case for “Unfair Methods of Competition”, rule-making was awarded the Antitrust Writing Award 2020 for the best general scientific article on antitrust law. Khan's scholarship has also been featured or discussed by The Atlantic, Bloomberg, The Economist, Financial Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. She was inducted into the Politico 50, the Global Thinkers of Foreign Policy Magazine, the Top 50 Thinkers of Prospect Magazine, WIRED25, the National Journal 50 and the Next Generation Leaders of Time Magazine. Prior to joining Columbia Law, Khan was an advisor to the Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee of the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, where she led the committee's investigation into digital markets and the release of its landmark report. She also served as legal advisor to Commissioner Rohit Chopra at the Federal Trade Commission and legal director of the Open Markets Institute. Khan is currently on leave and serves in the federal government.