Home Others Anti-Racist Education in Action: First Steps

Anti-Racist Education in Action: First Steps

Resources and technology Resources and guides Anti-Racist Education in Action: First Steps

Our goal in creating this resource is to provide a synthesis of anti-racist educational research for Columbia University faculties and graduate faculty who strive to incorporate anti-racial education into their personal teaching practice. We offer this guide as an entry point for faculty with different backgrounds, disciplines, identity positions, and teaching experiences who wish to participate in this work. The strategies, summaries, and additional links provide instructors with a theoretical framework in which to make meaningful, conscious decisions in their teaching.

In compiling this resource, the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) does not position itself as an expert in this field; rather, we learn and engage with our teaching community in an ongoing process of collective self-education. For this purpose, we look forward to your submissions (CTLFaculty@columbia.edu) if the lecturers have additional resources that are not listed here.

The only way to undo racism is to consistently identify and describe it - and then break it down. -DR. Ibram X. Kendi, How to be an Anti-Racist (2019)

The racial differences and inequalities highlighted by Covid-19, coupled with the ongoing police brutality that further underscores systemic racism in this nation, require reckoning and a response to the racist past and present of the United States. More specifically, this present moment calls on university professors to question the role of the academy in this unjust system and to envision and create a more just and just future. Part of this survey looks at the classroom and the pedagogies that have come into force: Are they fair? Are you anti-racist? Implementing anti-racist education is more than adding diverse content to a course or broader curriculum; it's about How is taught, even in courses in which race is not an issue (Kishimoto, 2018, p. 540, italics in the original). Anti-racist education is a paradigm within Critical Theory that serves to explain and counteract the persistence and effects of racism, with the practice as a focus on social justice for the creation of a democratic society in all respects (Blakeney, 2011, P. 119). It is an educational approach that exposes the structural inequalities within US society while promoting students' critical analytical skills as well as their critical self-reflection.

In creating this resource, the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) does not position itself as an expert in this field; rather, we learn and engage with our teaching community in an ongoing process of collective self-education. The CTL advocates diversity, equality, inclusion and belonging in higher education and we have including teaching aids to support educators in Columbia and beyond. Diversity and inclusion are fundamental to the CTL's mission and remain fundamental to the Columbia teaching community. While there is certainly an overlap between inclusive teaching practices and anti-racist pedagogy, they are not interchangeable. Inclusive teaching methods do not always address systemic inequality and also do not automatically include the healing, decolonization and justice-oriented work of anti-racist teaching methods.

This resource focuses on quote the experts in this field, synthesize their work to encourage further research and most importantly reinforcing the voices of those who have been doing this work for decades. The focus on citation, synthesis, and amplification of existing voices supports the overall goal of this resource: engaging the Columbia teacher community in discussions about anti-racist pedagogy and classroom practices. This resource is by no means exhaustive, but rather serves as a starting point for much more complex and extensive discussions. Classrooms serve as microcosms of the larger society and the resources on offer while they are on educational practices to support wider engagement for anti-racist actions in higher education.

Read on to:

  • accessfirst strategies for dealing with anti-racist educational practice
  • Engage with the literature on anti-racist pedagogy
  • Identify Key subjects or patterns in literature
  • Acquire Sources for further development, research and self-education
1. Self-education and recognition of racist trauma

Essential first steps in this process are self-education through anti-racist educational practices and the beginning of an iterative cycle of self-reflection and continuous learning. It is important to understand the racial trauma that students, especially those of color, can carry and bring into the classroom. It can be helpful to think about anti-racism in general, to see it as a cultural and societal necessity, before making any connections to a personal educational and pedagogical context.

The books by authors such as Kendi and Tatum offer a broader view of what it means to be anti-racist and to locate (anti) racism in larger historical and sociocultural contexts. While this provides a framework for starting conversations, Friere and Hooks provide more direct classroom support as their work is specifically about pedagogy that transforms the classroom into a liberating space. For those who wish to critically review their teaching practice, the related sources listed below may be helpful. The Talking About Race website of the National Museum of African American History and Culture offers different starting points depending on the perspective of the individual (ex: I am an educator or a parent / carer, etc.).

Related sources:

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the Oppressed . Bloomsbury.
Pedagogy of the Oppressed is best known for his criticism of the banking model of education, which Freire describes as mere reciting and memorizing facts. In this model, students store information and facts given to them by the teacher. Instead of the banking model, Frie suggests that educators view their students as co-creators of knowledge, as critical and reflective participants in the learning process, in which they construct and reconstruct meanings according to their own ideas; The classroom is transformed into a liberating and anti-repressive space.

Haken, B. (1994) Teaching Transgression: Education as a Practice of Freedom . Routledge.
In this collection of essays aimed at both teachers and students, Hooks writes about a new pedagogy that is turning the classroom into a transgressive space that is the only way in which education becomes the practice of freedom. Hooks writes that he helps students overcome any day-to-day racial, sexual, or class barriers they may face. Hooks understands education as a democratic act and as a practice of freedom.

He himself, I.X. (2019). How to be an Anti-Racist . One World.
Kendi offers a clear definition of what it means to be racist and, most importantly, anti-racist, arguing that racist policies are often hidden behind the guise of neutrality. In each chapter of this book, Kendi delves into the layers of systemic racism and outlines the history and connections between identities and positionalities. This book reads like a narrative journey, reflecting Kendi's own anti-racist development and transformation, and providing an introduction to intersectional identities and an understanding of what it means and what it takes to be anti-racist in 21st century America.

National Museum of African American History and Culture. (undated) Speaking of race .
This online guide offers several different ways to talk about race based on the user's location (ex: parent, educator, activist, etc.). Although the topics and resources included are the same for all positionalities, this guide provides different frameworks and justifications for each perspective, with the understanding that talking about race as an educator is very different, albeit just as important, as talking about race as a parent or parent Supervisor.

Tatum, B. D. (2017). Why are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria: And other conversations about race. Land registers.
Tatum's book, first published in 1997, provides an important socio-cultural context on race and racism in the United States. It shows the impact decades of racist politics and decision-making have had on the educational and developmental experiences of people, especially children, of colored skin. This 20th Anniversary 2017 edition, cited here, offers commentary on post-Obama America and offers signs of hope for the future, although it is recognized that not much has changed since this book was originally published in 1997.

2. Question your positionality and (un) conscious prejudices

Self-education is an iterative and ongoing process. Knowing this, it is crucial that individuals begin self-questioning and think critically about personal positionality and prejudice. Before asking students to do this work in your class, it is important to have some experience with the process first. You can even opt for this interrogation With Students to model the complexity (and sometimes the discomfort) of this process. It's about becoming more aware of the choices you make and how your perspective and position in society affects those choices. It is also a process of questioning your own values ​​and beliefs: What is your vision of the ideal student? What prejudices could you have? Becoming aware is the first step in changing and changing your perspective.

The following sources offer different approaches for this self-questioning. Adichie's TED talk asks people to reconsider the individual stories they can hold about different groups of people and the damage these individual (and often false) narratives do. Ahmed, along with Ash et al. a broader administrative perspective that can help survey positionalities in a larger institutional context. The Kernahan chapter, along with the resource from the Wheaton College Center for Collaborative Teaching and Learning, provides specific strategies and actions to be taken during the critical self-reflection process. Finally, LinkedIn Learning (available to all Columbia faculties, students, and employees) offers courses on unconscious bias and more that can be used in person or in the classroom.

Related sources:

Adichie, C. N. (2009, July). The danger of a single story [Video]. TED.
Adichie describes her experiences coming to the United States for college and highlights the importance of cultural awareness and the critical risks that arise when people have individual ideas (or stories) about other groups of people.

Ahmed, S. (2012). Talk about racism . In S. Ahmed On the subject of inclusion: racism and diversity in institutional life (S. 141-71). Herzog U.P.
Ahmed highlights the rhetorical construction of diversity and inclusion initiatives in organizational structures. Ahmed argues that most institutions' diversity initiatives actually harm those who report racist incidents as they require a response to racism issues. Ahmed argues that those who report these incidents are more likely to become a problem than racism or the racist acts themselves.

Ash, A. Hill, R., Risdon, S. N., & Jun, A. (2020). Anti-Racism in Higher Education: A Model for Change . Race and Pedagogy Diary, 4 (3), 1-35.
In their article, Ash et. al (2020) propose a model for changing the demographics of institutional leadership. They propose a top-down model in which white higher administrations must participate in the critical self-reflection of their own whiteness and privileges and the conscious and unconscious impact they have on their decision-making. They also envision a future where all members of a campus community have been educated about racial inequality and can work together to challenge and address systemic racial inequality and inequality in higher education.

mexico health care problems

Columbia University Information Technology. (undated). LinkedIn learning .
All Columbia students, faculty, and employees have access to online courses through LinkedIn Learning. While much of the focus of these courses is on business and other technological skills, there are some courses like Unconscious Bias by Stacey Gordon or Confronting Bias: Thriving Across Our Differences byVernā Myers and Arianna Huffington,in connection with developing an awareness of unconscious prejudices and how to counter them.

Kernahan, C. (2019). Pulling Yourself Together: Develop a Secure Teacher Identity. In C. Kernahan Lessons on Race and Racism in the College Classroom: Notes from a White Professor (S. 71-98) . West Virginia U.P.
Kernahan's book (which is fully cited under Item 3 below) provides specific strategies and recommendations for teaching about race in higher education. From her own experience as a white professor, Kernahan speaks about the most common resistances, challenges and difficulties. This particular chapter emphasizes the importance of individual teacher identity prior to classroom discussions. Kernahan emphasizes the need for critical and ongoing self-reflection and self-questioning, while offering specific opportunities to do this work.

Wheaton College Center for Collaborative Teaching and Learning (2020). Become an anti-racist educator .
This page of the Center for Collaborative Teaching and Learning at Wheaton College is based on much of the literature cited here and presents practices that help us become anti-racist. These practices are further broken down into individual practices that focus on worldview and perspective, and more specific practices that educators can use in their classrooms. Similar to this updated guide, the website supports these practices with further reading and resources for ongoing self-education.

3. Close curriculum gaps through targeted course design

In addition to critical self-reflection, it is important to review course materials and content to ensure that your course design is intentionally and explicitly Anti racist. For a course in which race is a content or curricular focus, white should be decentered and multiple perspectives and voices represented while The course. For a course that is racing Not the content or curricular orientation, there is the possibility of disciplinary questioning: What counts as valuable knowledge or knowledge in the discipline? Who makes these decisions? And whose voices stay out of discipline because of this?

The related resources below provide assistance at various stages in the course design process. Although not organized by stages of course design, Anti-Racism and Allies in the classroom provides additional resources categorized by disciplinary focus. The work of Kernahan, Kishimoto, and Smith et al. offer strategies that can be implemented throughout the course design as well as in the classroom itself. For faculty interested in adopting anti-racist policies in the university and beyond, the Social Justice Curriculum Tool by Taylor et al. three principles that can be applied to a curriculum as a straightforward but effective starting point.

Related sources:

Brown University Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning. (undated). Effective teaching is anti-racist teaching.
This website offers five starting points for the implementation of anti-racist teachings. These starting points tie in with the center's conceptualization of what it means to be an anti-racist teacher. Areas identified include: Course Objectives, Content, Discussions, and Ratings. In relation to these areas, this resource provides language samples and examples from Brown's teaching community.

Imazeki, J. (2020). Anti-racism and allies in the classroom .
This document provides further support for anti-racism and allies. Although not a single source, this document categorizes the resources according to general topics (social justice, anti-racism, etc.) and then offers resources according to disciplinary focus (ex: anthropology, art, economics, health, etc.).

Kernahan, C. (2019). Lessons on Race and Racism in the College Classroom: Notes from a White Professor. West Virginia U.P.
Kernahan's book emphasizes a race and racism teaching approach that focuses on compassion and caring while remaining honest and critical of racism and racial inequality in the United States. Although she writes from a disciplinary focus in the race is At the heart of the curriculum, the book offers specific and actionable recommendations that can be tailored to the particular teaching context. The chapters are presented at the various stages that an instructor might encounter or experience including: engagement with students, individual position, class community and expectations, and general course content. This structure, coupled with the explicit consideration of strategies and recommendations, offers the teacher concrete ideas that should be taken into account.

Kishimoto, K. (2018). Anti-Racist Education: From Faculty's Self-Reflection to Organization Inside and Outside the Classroom . Ethnicity and Education , twenty-one (4), 540-554.
Kishimoto offers an understandable definition of anti-racial education - particularly one that includes classrooms where race is not an issue (p. 540). Kishimoto's article provides a five-step overview of an anti-racist approach to teaching and course delivery that instructors can interpret and take up in their own context. Most importantly, Kishimoto offers a look at anti-racist education aside Course content and emphasize that this is the approach How one teaches.

Taylor, S. D., Veri, M. J., Eliason, M., Hermoso, J. C. R., Bolter, N. D. & Van Olphen, J. E. (2019). The Social Justice Curriculum Design Tool: A First Step in Social Justice Education . Journal Committed to Social Change on Race and Ethnicity (JCSCORE), 5 (2), 133-66.
Tayloret. al developed a curriculum design tool to help teachers take a first step actionable Step towards the introduction of a social pedagogy. They argue that as the student's first point of contact with a course and instructor, the curriculum is both an ideal and crucial starting point. Your tool has been developed with a framework for social justice and inclusive course design and is based on three core principles: relationship, community and process.

4. Foster a compassionate class community and meet students where they are

It is important to give students the opportunity to take into account their own positionalities and prejudices in order to foster their critical awareness. You can even share your own experiences with this critical reflection as a model for the process (see list item 2 above). In connection with these opportunities, it is equally important to promote a classroom environment that allows for such reflection and consultation. Students come from a variety of perspectives and experiences, with a wide range of beliefs and understandings of a particular subject. Regardless of the content of the course, if you bring an explicitly anti-racist framework with you, consider meeting your students where they are and working from there. This can mean accepting difficult conversations and resistance from students in the classroom. One way to start this process and overcome resistance is to teach students in metacognitive or contemplative practice as it can help students identify their own starting points in the process.

The related resources listed below provide strategies for creating a classroom environment that is conducive to participating in and navigating these discussions. From helping teachers respond to potential biases and microaggression (especially in the online environment) to sharing strategies for other challenging teaching moments, these sources are cross-contextual.

Related sources:

Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning (2017). Inclusive education: Principle 1 .
While the entire guide to inclusive teaching is a valuable resource, Principle 1 focuses on creating and supporting a class climate for all Students. An inclusive classroom is essential, but it is only the first step. In order for the (sometimes uncomfortable) work of critical self-reflection and awareness to begin, the classroom environment must be created. This Principle 1 focused page offers recommendations and strategies for promoting the necessary environment.

Cora learning. (2020, April 28). Responding to racial prejudice and micro-aggression in the online environment [Video]. Youtube.
This webinar, offered by Cora Learning and by Drs. Frank Harris III and J. Luke Wood present strategies for dealing with racial prejudice and microaggressions in the online space. By establishing common definitions and understanding and using specific case study examples, the webinar underscores the important role teachers play in properly and timely addressing these actions. It also highlights the uniqueness of the online environment and the new considerations that such a space requires.

Harbin, M. B., Thurber, A. & Bandy, J. (2019). Teaching Race, Racism and Racial Justice: Educational Principles and Teaching Strategies for Instructors . Race and Pedagogy Journal , 4 (1), 1-37.
Harbin et al. open your article with an appreciation of the challenges and complexities of teaching about race, racism and racial justice in the college classroom. Following this confirmation, Harbin et al. identify five the most common challenges and potential strategies for addressing these challenges in college classrooms. You balance the focus of these challenges and realize that they are off both the perspective of student and teacher.

Smith, L., Kahubeck-West, S., Payton, G. & Adams, E. (2017). White professors teach on Racism: Challenges and Rewards. The consulting psychologist, 45 (5), 651-68.
Smith et al. Address the challenges white professors may face while teaching about race and racism. While some of the challenges identified relate to the process of critical self-reflection, Smith et al. offer strategies to address these challenges in the classroom. They also highlight the importance of white professors participating in multicultural initiatives in general and teaching on racism in particular, despite potential challenges or concerns.

Supiano, B. (2020). Teaching: When students refuse to learn about racism. Chronicle of higher education .
This column from the Chronicle of higher education The weekly newsletter Teaching presents an interview with sociologist Jennifer Patrice Sims. In it, she shares her experience teaching courses on race and racism at several mostly white institutions and offers strategies for trainers who may encounter resistance and rejection in the classroom.

5. Engage with the wider campus community and commit to actions outside of the classroom

An important step in studying anti-racist education is working with students to identify everyday things that [they] can do (Kishimoto, 2018, p. 545). While participating in classroom discussions and activities is certainly of great importance for students, helping them understand the actions they can take in their life outside of the classroom is equally important. One potential space for engagement beyond the classroom is the wider campus and institutional community. Connect students with available information and resources across campus to help them engage more broadly; You can even use these campus initiatives and resources to help students connect to their classroom discussions and reflections.

In July 2020, President Bollinger underlined Colombia's commitment against racism , urge the campus community to Take part . In addition to these commitments, the following sources are Colombian and provide only a few available avenues for campus community members to engage in anti-racist activities outside of the classroom.

Related sources:

Columbia Office of University Life. (o.D.). Resources to promote racial justice and Eliminate violence against black people .
Columbia's Office of University Life has compiled a list of multimedia resources with the express aim of eliminating violence against blacks and engaging in anti-racist practices. This collection is constantly expanding and growing, and the Office actively encourages recommendations for additions. The list includes suggested books, films, articles, podcasts, and more.

Columbia School of Social Work. (o.D.). CSSW and Racial Justice .
Columbia School of Social Work (CSSW) members are actively involved in Racial Justice Initiatives. This page provides a summary of some of these initiatives, as well as access to videos and further reading to learn more about the work that has been done.

Foner, Eric (Faculty Sponsor). (o.D.). Columbia University and Slavery .
This website, created by members of the Columbia campus community, provides information on Colombia's history of slavery. The site itself is organized according to historical epochs, historical figures and student research.

Gottesman-Bibliotheken: Teachers College, Columbia University. (2020). Café-Buchanzeige: Teaching Anti-Racism - Gottesman Libraries .
The Gottesman Libraries at Teachers College have a digital book exhibition that focuses on anti-racism and building a just and just society. Since the introduction of the digital book display, this display has encompassed a call for greater respect, acceptance and appreciation of diversity in all its forms, especially in the educational sector, with race being a prime example in teaching for a diverse democracy.

References

Adichie, C. N. (2009, July). The danger of a single story [Video]. TED.

Ahmed, S. (2012). Talk about racism . In S. Ahmed On the subject of inclusion: racism and diversity in institutional life (S. 141-71). Herzog U.P.

Ash, A. Hill, R., Risdon, S. N., & Jun, A. (2020). Anti-Racism in Higher Education: A Model for Change . Race and Pedagogy Diary, 4 (3), 1-35.

Blakeney, A. M. (2011). Anti-Racist Education: Definition, Theory, Purpose and Professional Development. Curriculum and Pedagogy Journal 2 (1), 119-32.

Bollinger, L. C. (2020, July 21). Colombia's commitment to anti-racism. [Announcement].

Brown University Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning. (undated). Effective

Teaching is anti-racist teaching.

new york college and university

Columbia Office of University Life. (2020, 20. Juli). Colombia's commitment against racism.

—. (o.D.). Resources to Promote Racial Justice and Eliminate Violence Against Black Black .

Columbia School of Social Work. (o.D.). CSSW and Racial Justice .

Columbia University Center for Teaching and Learning. (o.D.) Accessibility Resource .

—. (o.D.). Contemplative Pedagogy.

-. (2017). Inclusive education: Principle 1 .

—. (o.D.). Including teaching materials.

-. (2018). Metacognition.

Columbia University Information Technology. (undated). LinkedIn learning .

Cora learning. (2020, April 28). Responding to racial prejudice and micro-aggression in the online environment [Video]. Youtube.

Foner, Eric (Faculty Sponsor). (o.D.). Columbia University and Slavery .

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the Oppressed . Bloomsbury.

Gottesman-Bibliotheken: Teachers College, Columbia University. (2020). Café-Buchanzeige:

Teaching Anti-Racism - Gottesman Libraries .

Harbin, M. B., Thurber, A. & Bandy, J. (2019). Teaching Race, Racism and Racial Justice: Educational Principles and Teaching Strategies for Instructors . Race and Pedagogy Journal , 4 (1), 1-37.

Haken, B. (1994) Teaching Transgression: Education as a Practice of Freedom . Routledge.

Imazeki, J. (2020). Anti-racism and allies in the classroom .

He himself, I.X. (2019). How to be an Anti-Racist . One World.

Kernahan, C. (2019). Lessons on Race and Racism in the College Classroom: Notes from a White Professor. West Virginia U.P.

Kishimoto, K. (2018). Anti-Racist Education: From Faculty's Self-Reflection to Organization Inside and Outside the Classroom . Ethnicity and Education , twenty-one (4), 540-554.

National Museum of African American History and Culture. (undated) Speaking of race .

Smith, L., Kahubeck-West, S., Payton, G. & Adams, E. (2017). White professors teach on Racism: Challenges and Rewards. The consulting psychologist, 45 (5), 651-68.

Supiano, B. (2020). Teaching: When students refuse to learn about racism. Chronicle of higher education .

Tatum, B. D. (2017). Why are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria: And other conversations about race. Land registers.

Taylor, S. D., Veri, M. J., Eliason, M., Hermoso, J. C. R., Bolter, N. D. & Van Olphen, J. E. (2019). The Social Justice Curriculum Design Tool: A First Step in Social Justice Education . Journal Committed to Social Change on Race and Ethnicity (JCSCORE), 5 (2), 133-66.

Wheaton College Center for Collaborative Teaching and Learning (2020). Become an anti-racist educator .

CTL resources and technology for you.

The CTL researches and experiments with new digital and educational tools to support your teaching.

overview

Interesting Articles

Editor'S Choice

A league of its own
A league of its own
PhD program
PhD program
Earn a Ph.D. in social work from Columbia University. We have a prestigious and influential Ph.D. Program since 1950.
Carlos Sandoval
Carlos Sandoval
Zeynep Celik zum Antrittsprofessor von Sakip Sabanci ernannt
Zeynep Celik zum Antrittsprofessor von Sakip Sabanci ernannt
July 1, 2021 - Dr. Zeynep Çelik was named the first Sakıp Sabancı Visiting Professor at the Sakıp Sabancı Center for Turkish Studies at Columbia University. Her in-depth expertise and unique historical perspective on the architecture and urban planning of the region will enhance the goals of the Sakıp Sabancı Center.
Lynnise E. Pantin
Lynnise E. Pantin
Lynnise Pantin ’03 is the founding director of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic. Students at the clinic develop legal skills by providing legal services in a range of transactional, intellectual property and governance matters to community organizations and low and middle income entrepreneurs. Pantin's pedagogy is shaped by her scholarship, which focuses on the systemic socio-economic barriers that colored and humble entrepreneurs face. Her recent journal articles include The Economic Justice Imperative for Transactional Law Clinics in the Villanova Law Review and The Wealth Gap and the Racial Disparities in the Startup Ecosystem. Pantin joined Columbia Law School in 2019 after opening her clinic as a visiting professor for a year. Previously, she was the founder and director of the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Clinic at Boston College Law School and co-founder of the Transactional Law Clinic at New York Law School, where she taught legal practice and directed the Social Entrepreneurship Initiative of the Impact Center for Public Welfare Law. Pantin began her career as an Associate at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP practicing corporate and securities law in the investment management group of the firm's corporate division. She advised private investment funds, their sponsors and investors on all issues relating to the establishment and operation of national and international funds. It also provided free business transaction, incorporation and governance, and regulatory compliance services to nonprofits and small businesses. Prior to becoming an attorney, Pantin was an elementary school teacher in Washington, D.C.
Qin Gao
Qin Gao
Qin Gao is a leading authority on the Chinese social system and founding director of Columbia University's China Center for Social Policy, the
Anti-Racist Education in Action: First Steps
Anti-Racist Education in Action: First Steps