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Qin Gao

Professor of Social Policy and Social Work; Director, China Center for Social Policy Download CV Room 708 212-851-2227 qin.gao@columbia.edu

Qin Gao is a leading authority on the Chinese social system and founding director of Columbia University's China Center for Social Policy, the first research center of its kind within a social work school.


Qin Gao is Professor of Social Policy and Social Work and Founding Director of the China Center for Social Policy at Columbia University. She is a faculty member of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC) and the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and a member of the Columbia Global Centers Faculty Steering Committee Beijing, Academic Board Member of the China Institute for Income Distribution at Beijing Normal University and Public Intellectual Fellow of the National Committee on United States-China Relations.

Dr. Gao's research examines the changing nature of the Chinese welfare system and its impact on poverty and inequality; Effectiveness of Dibao, China's Top Social Welfare Program; social protection for rural-to-urban migrants in China and Asian-American immigrants; and transnational comparative social policies and programs. Dr. Gao's book, Welfare, Labor, and Poverty: Social Aid in China (Oxford University Press, 2017) presents a systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the world's largest social assistance program. Dr. Gao's work has been supported by several national and international funding sources, such as the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the National Social Science Fund of China, the Asian Development Bank, UNICEF, and the World Bank.

Dr. Gao holds a BA from China Youth University of Political Studies (China), an MA from Peking University (China), and an MPhil and PhD from Columbia School of Social Work. She was recently interviewed by the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs ; the External Relations Council ; and SupChinas Sinica-Podcast .

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